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CRIME - CITY OF LONDON

 
Calendar of City Coroners Rolls (City of London) 1300-1378

On the death of Stephen de Lenne, taverner.

On Wednesday the Feast of St Thomas [21 Dec.] the year aforesaid (A.D. 1323), it happened that a certain Stephen de Lenne, taverner, lay killed in a shop on the wharf of Nicholas Crowe in the parish of St. Bartholomew (probably a clerical error for St Botolph) in the Ward of Billyngesgate. On hearing this, the said Coroner and Sheriffs proceeded thither, and having summoned good men of that Ward and of the three nearest Wards, viz.: Tower, Bridge and Langebourne, they diligently enquired how it happened. The jurors say that when on the preceding Monday, after the hour of curfew, the said Stephen and a certain Arcus de Rikelinge of Brabant were playing at tables (ad tabulas) in the tavern of William de Staneforde, in the Ward of Douegate, and the said Stephen had won the money of the said Arcus, the said Arcus being thereby moved to anger, by false words led the said Stephen thence as far as the gate of the church of St. Magnus and of malice aforethought drew his knife called "tranchour," and struck the said Stephen on the belly under the navel causing two mortal wounds each of them one inch long and four inches deep; that, thus wounded, he went thence as far as the said shop, and there lingered until Tuesday the eve of St. Thomas aforesaid when he died at the hour of midnight of the said wounds. Being asked what became of the said Arcus, they say that he immediately fled, but whither, or who received him, they know not, nor had he any chattels so far as they could learn. Being asked who were present when it happened, they say No one except those two, nor do they suspect any one of the death except the said Arcus. Precept to the Sheriffs to attach the said Arcus when found in their bailiwick. The corpse viewed on which the said wounds appeared. Afterwards the said Arcus surrendered himself to the prison of Neugate. Four neighbours attached, viz. : Robert le Treire, by John Chaundeler and Roger le Berman. Richard de Pelham, by John ie Taverner and Roger Starling, John de la Barre, by John atte Marche and Thomas de lleford. Geoffrey Sterre, by Richard Sterre and Alan atte Stone.

On the death of Richard Herkyn

On Thursday after the feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.] ao 18 Edward II. [A.D. 1324]. information given to the aforesaid Coroner and Sheriffs that a certain Richard Herkyn lay dead of a death other than his rightful death in a well called "Draghewell" within the tenement of John de Braye (?) tenanted by John atte Sole, in the parish of St. Dunstan in Tower Ward.  On hearing this, the aforesaid Coroner and Sheriffs proceeded thither and having summoned good men of that Ward and of the three nearest Wards, viz. : Billingesgate, Alegate and Langebourne, they diligently enquired how it happened. The jurors say that when on the preceding Tuesday, at the third hour the said Richard descended into the well by means of a hemp rope with a bucket to recover a piece of board lying therein, he by accident fell and was drowned. Being asked who were present, the jurors say that a certain William Stiward, " coupere," who first found him and raised the cry, and nobody else, nor do they suspect any one except the accident. The body viewed, &c. The cord, bucket and hook? by which the cord was hung appraised by the jurors at 12 pence for which John de Caustone, the Sheriff, will answer. Precept to the Sheriff to stop up the well.

William Stiward, the finder, attached by John atte Sole and Henry Sterre. Four neighbours attached, viz. : William de Braye, by Henry le Frenshe and Adam Bushe. William le Luton, by William de Derham and Ralph Miles. John Box, by Thomas de Athelingflet, "barbour,"and Hugh le Taillour. John de Bengo, by Henry Trippe and Hamo le Smythe.

On the death of John le Brewere

Thursday before the Feast of St. Edmund the King [20 Nov.] the same year, information given to the aforesaid Coroner and Sheriffs that John le Brewere lay dead of a death other than his rightful death on the river side of the Flete in the parish of St. Bride in the Ward of Fardone Without. Thereupon, they proceeded thither, and having summoned good men of that Ward and of the Ward of Farndone Within, they diligently enquired how it happened. The jurors—viz.: [William] deToppesfeld, William de Waltham, John de Boseworthe, Peter le Quissoner, Robert de Asshe, Richard * * * John Grigg, Edmund de Gerbaldesham, " cordewaner," William de Abyndone, cook, Gilbert atte * * * Robert Pikard, Alexander le Frensshe, and Adam de Petertone of the Ward of Farndone Without; William de Gloucestre, * * * Huberd, Henry Knyght, John atte Watere, Peter de Norwych, taverner, and Walter le Barber of the Ward of Farndone Within—say that on the preceding Tuesday, John Bercard and Alexander Gydetty, merchants of Florence, were searching the streets of the City from sunrise until the third hour for John le Brewere and four other men, whose names the jurors know not, in order to arrest them for a robbery of money and goods committed on them on Tuesday last in the high road between Romford and Brendewode co. Essex that the said John le Brewere seeing them coming in the parish of St. Nicholas Shambles took refuge in Paul's Wharf, where he entered the river the tide being low, intending to make his way, under cover of the wharves to Flete bridge, but the tide rising in the meantime he was drowned. There were found upon his body 160 florins, each florin being worth 4s. of which the merchants had been robbed, and John Bercard's seal. The money and seal remain in the custody of Hugh le Marberer, one of the Sheriffs. Precept to the Sheriffs, &c. Four neighbours attached, viz. : Simon Larmourer, by Thomas de Bandone and Robert le Sherman. William de Toppesfeld, by Robert Raby and William Sterre. Robert de Asshe, by Gilbert atte More and Stephen le " Ku." Reginald de Thorpe, by Andrew le Hornere and William de Stanford. Writ of certiorari to the Sheriffs and Coroner touching the above. Witness Edward Duke of Cornwall, Earl of Chester, the King's son, Warden of England, at Kenyngton 15 Nov. 12 Edward III. [a.d. 1338]. Writ to the Sheriffs of London bidding them return the money and seal to the above John Bercard and Alexander Gydette of which they had been robbed. Witness Edward Duke of Cornwall, &c., at Kenyngton, 22 Nov. 12 Edward III. [a.d. 1338].

On the death of William Wombe, a cleanser of latrines (mundatoris cloacarum)

Friday after the Feast of St. Petronilla [31 May 1339] the same year, information given to the aforesaid Coroner and Sheriffs that William Wombe lay dead of a death other than his rightful death in the Thames near Flete Bridge, in the parish of St. Bride, in the Ward of Farndone Without. Thereupon they proceeded thither, and having summoned good men of that Ward, they diligently enquired how it happened. The jurors—viz.: William de Waltham, Thomas de Toppesfeld, Robert Cole, Henry de Petresfeld, Richard atte Barre, John le Beste, Alan de Fysshbourne, Alexander de York, "taillour," William Bronde, John Waillshman, cordwainer, Peter le Sporier, and John de Boseworth, junior—say that on the preceding Wednesday, at the hour of curfew, the aforesaid William entered the river at le Heywharf to wash himself, being alone, and was accidentally drowned; that the corpse was not found until the Friday aforesaid when the tide had carried it as far as Flete Bridge. The corpse viewed, &c. Four neighbours attached, viz. : Simon Larmourer, by Thomas de Bandone and Robert le Sherman. William de Toppesfeld, by Robert Rabi and William Sterre. Robert de Asshe, by Gilbert atte More and Stephen le Keu.  Reginald de Thorpe, by Andrew le Hornere and William de Stanford.

On the death of John de Pykeryng and Thomas de Pokelyngtone.

The above Tuesday before the Feast of Nativ. St. John Bapt. [24 June] the same year, information given to the aforesaid Coroner and Sheriffs that John de Pykeryng and Thomas de kelyngtone of co. York, clerks of the Chancery of the lord King, lay dead of a death other than their rightful death in the rent of Thomas de Lyncoln, pleader (narrator), in the parish of St. Andrew de Holebourn in the Ward of Farndone Without. Thereupon they proceeded thither, and having summoned good men of that Ward, and of the two nearest Wards, viz.: Farndone Within and Castle Baynard, they diligently enquired how it happened. The jurors—viz. : Walter de Mosehache, Nicholas le Curreour, Robert de Clyderowe, John de Stratford, John Chise, Jolin Gyles, Andrew le Coupere, Richard le Smale, William le Mareschal, Richard Paget, William Schapman, Richard Doublehod, "Davyt'' de [Tut]tebury, John de Gaytone, "taillour," and Adam de Pontysbury of the Ward of Farndone Without; Roger atte Bel * * *, William le Tieghlere, Richard atte Hulle, Clement le Smyth, Henry le Bowyere, Elias Fraunceys, * * * , le Clerk, " bocher," of the Ward of Farndone Within ; Richard de Lenne, John Jordan, Robert Martyn, William le Haftere, junior, William de Newerk, Adam de Bedeford and William de Hoxtone of the Ward of Castle Baynard—say that on Sunday before the Feast of St. John Bapt. [24 June] a° 13 F.dward III. [a.d. 1339], William Fort of co. Somerset, John Berkeryk of co. Cumberland, John de Grendone of co. Northampton, and John de Hatfeld Brodok, co. Essex, apprentices of the Bench, after the hour of curfew, assaulted the above John de Pykeryng and Thomas de Pokelyngton in the High Street opposite the rent of Thomas de Lyncoln and beat and wounded them with swords and " balghstafs," leaving them half dead; that the said William Fort, John Berkeryk, John de Grendone and John de Hatfeld immediately fled, but whither the jurors know not; that John de Pykeryng lingered until Monday, when he died, and Thomas de Pokelyngton until the Tuesday following when he also died of his wounds. Precept to the Sheriffs, &;c, Four neighbours attached, viz, : John Tavy by Robert Raby, and Richard de * * * Robert le Goldesmyth, by William Sterre and Gilbert atte More. David de Tuttebury, by Andrew le Hornere and William de Stanford. Gilbert le Tieghlere, by John de S * * * and John de lppegrave.

On the death of William Rose of Grenewych, mariner.

Wednesday after the Feast of St. James Ap. [25 July] the same year (1339), information given the aforesaid Coroner and Sheriffs that William Rose of Grenewych lay dead of a death other than his rightful death in the rent of Sir John de Pulteneye Knt. in the parish of St. Martin Orgar in Bridge Ward. Thereupon they proceeded thither and having summoned good men of that Ward and of the three nearest Wards, viz. : Billingesgate, Candelwykstret and Douuegate they diligently enquired how it happened. The jurors—viz.: Thomas atte Wyche, John de Herstede, William Ede, James Waterbal, John de Grenewych, Walter atte Wharf, Gilbert le Dyeghere, William Olyver, John de Ledrede, Richard le Gyldere, Hugh de Mockynge, and Thomas le Brewere of Bridge Ward; Henry Sterre, Thomas de Ware, John de Hastyngges, and John de Toppesfeld of the Ward of Billingesgate, Stephen Arnald, Richard de Hereford, Richard Chiviot, Thomas de Cherteseye, and John de Myrnmes of the Ward of Candelwykestret; Stephen de Dureme, William de Chesham, John de Bandone, Giles le Taillour, Richard de Carletone, and Edmund le Coupere of the Ward of Douuegate—say that on Saturday before the Feast of St. Margaret [20 July] a° 13 Edward III. [a.d. 1339], at the hour of Vespers, John Loveryk of Sandewyz and Robert le Dyeghere of Manytre co. Essex, mariners, were seeking William Rose aforesaid in order to kill him, on account of a quarrel, when they found him standing in the High Street at the corner of Oystergate in the parish of St. Magnus; that thereupon the aforesaid Robert privily drew his sword and therewith struck the said William on the top of his head, inflicting a mortal wound 6 inches broad and penetrating to the brain, so that he died on Wednesday after the Feast of St. James Ap. [25 July] after dinner; that the said John Loveryk drew two long knives and rescued the said Robert, and with him took flight but whither, &c., the jurors know not. The said Robert had no chattels. The chattels of John Loveryk were appraised by William Box, John de Navestok, John Sperlyng, Robert Bygot, Peter le Taillour and John de Huntyngdone, viz. : a table at 2s., twelve old pairs of "bracys" at 2s., three chests and a coffer at 5s. 3d., two folding tables, two chairs, and two forms at 2s. 6d. Total 11s. 9d., for which William de Pontefract, one of the Sheriffs will answer. Precept to the Sheriffs, &c. Four neighbours attached, viz, : William de Kent, by William de Hockele and Gilbert atte Hulle. William de Stanford, by William Olyver and Hugh de Portes-mouth. Stephen de Stanford, by Peter de Ware and William de Walkerne. Stephen de Craye, by Stephen Lucas and Richard Andrew.

On the death of William de Kempstone, brewer.

Wednesday after the Feast of St. Bartholomew [24 Aug. 1339] the same year, information given to the aforesaid Coroner and Sheriffs that William de Kempstone, a brewer, lay dead of a death other than his rightful death, in a brewhouse held by Walter de Seynmore of William de Hales in the parish of St. Dunstan in the Ward of Farndone Without. Thereupon they proceeded thither, and having summoned good men of that Ward and of the two nearest Wards, viz.: Castle Baynard and Farndone Within, they diligently enquired how it happened. The jurors—viz.: Gilbert de Alemaygne, John le Vannere, Alan Fisshbourne, Philip le Clerk, John Gerlaund, John de Ippegrave, John le Mareschal, John le Ussher, R * * * le Brewere, Hugh le Hattere, Henry le Webbe, John de Hundestone, John le Masoun, barber, John de Wynchestre, William Shytenangre and Henry de Kirkebrigge of the Ward of Farndone Without; John Seward, Adam de Bedeford, William de Corbrigge, Richard Beneyte, Thomas le Hakeneyman, Robert de Bokyngham, skinner, Robert de Flatbury, tailor, of the Ward of Castle Baynard ; Richard atte Hulle, Roger de Cornewayle and Elias Fraunseys of the Ward of Farndone Within—say that on Monday the Eve of St. Bartholomew [24 Aug.] last passed, John de Shaffeld a strange boy (garcio extraneus) at the hour of curfew, entered the aforesaid brewhouse and privily took away a woman's hood worth 9d. , that the above William de Kempstone followed the boy as far as Secollane in order to recover the hood, when the boy struck him in the belly with a knife called " bydawe," near the navel, inflicting a mortal wound, and immediately fled, but whither, &c., the jurors know not ; that the wounded man returned to the brewhouse where he died of his wound on Tuesday the Feast of St. Bartholomew at the hour of Vespers. The corpse viewed, &c. Precept to the Sheriffs, &c. Four neighbours attached, viz. : Hugh de Arderne, by Robert Petit and John Elys. Andrew le Hornere, by John Rote and Richard le Heymongere. John Gerlaund, by Thomas Crabbe and Robert le Haneper. John le Vannere, by Thomas ie Chaundeler and William Sterre.

On the death of John Bone, " dyeghere."

Monday after the Feast of St. Bartholomew [24 Aug. 1340] the same year, information given to the aforesaid Coroner and Sheriffs that the above John Bone lay dead of a death other than his rightful death in a well (fonte) in the rent of Gregory atte Shire in the parish of St Andrew de Estchepe, in Billingsgate Ward. There-upon they proceeded thither, and, having summoned good men of that Ward they diligently enquired how it happened. The jurors—viz.: Simon Cook, "webbe," Roger le Chaundeler, Thomas atte Greene, "webbe," William Sharpe, "webbe," John Vynour, Andrew Matheu, John de Wrotham, "turnour," William de Aylesbury, " turnour," Richard de Elmerigge, " taillour" Hugh Joye, Richard le Pursere, and Robert Muryet, "taillour"—say that on the aforesaid Monday the said John Bone was going down the well by means of a long " pole " to recover a bucket which was there, when he fell and, there being but little water in the well, he immediately died. Precept to the Sheriff to cause the well to be stopt up and to attach four of the nearest neighbours. The pole appraised at one penny for which Roger de Forsham, one of the Sheriffs, will answer. Four neighbours attached, viz. : John Youn, by John de Whittewelle and Martin le Bakere. Richard de Lombhuth, by Peter Sterre and John de Donstaple, skinner. Simon de Cantliar', " carpenter," by John Reve and Thomas atte Knolle. Thomas Prentiz, by Gilbert atte Crouche, " taillour," and Robert de Hakeneye.

webbe =   Weaver

On the death of Walter de Benigtone, tailor

On Wednesday after the Feast of Annunciation, B.M. [25 March], ao 18 Edward II. [A.D. 1325], information given to the aforesaid Coroner and Sheriffs that a certain Walter de Benigtone lay dead of a death other than his rightful death in the house held by Walter de Mordone of Geoffrey de Wade, in the parish of St. Michael in the Ward of Bridge. On hearing this, they proceeded thither, and having summoned good men of that Ward and of the three nearest Wards, viz. : Douegate, Candelwykstret and Billingesgate, they, diligently enquired how it happened. The jurors say that when on the preceding Sunday at the hour of Compline the said Walter de Benygtone, with seventeen companions, unknown, had come to the brewhouse of Gilbert de Mordone, "stokfissmongere," in the Ward of Bridge with stones in their hoods, swords, knives and other weapons, and were there sitting and drinking four gallons of beer, lying in wait to seize and carry off Emma, daughter of the late Robert Pourte then under the charge of the said Gilbert; that perceiving this, Mabel the wife of Gilbert de Mordone and Geoffrey, the brewer of the said Gilbert, prayed the said Walter and his associates to depart thence, but they replied that they would stay there, whether wanted or not, to spend their money, as the house was public (mercatoria); whereupon the said Mabel seeing their folly returned to her chamber taking the said Emma with her; that the said Walter and his associates being on that account moved with anger assaulted the said Geoffrey and Robert de Mordone and other inmates of the house and struck the said Robert on the head with stories, so that he raised the cry and fled into the High Street, and the said Walter with a knife in one hand and a " misericorde " in the other followed him to kill him. Thereupon, Benedict de Warde and other neighbours came up to pacify them, when the said Walter assaulted the said Benedict with the aforesaid weapons, and refused to surrender to the King's peace, and the said Benedict seizing a "balstaf" from a stranger, therewith struck the said Walter on the top of his head so that he fell to the ground at the entrance of the lane (venelle) of Gilbert de Mordone in the parish aforesaid, and was thence carried by Walter de Arderne and Christina his wife into the lane of St. Michael aforesaid, where they laid him on the pavement near the fountain where he lay the whole of the following night, and on the morrow he was carried half dead by them into the house of Geoffrey de Warde, where he immediately died. Being asked who were present when this happened, the jurors say there were Geoffrey le Brewere, Robert de Mordon and the said Walter and Benedict, and a number of others whose names they know not. Being asked what became of the said Benedict, the jurors say that he forthwith fled, but whither they know not, nor who received him, nor do they suspect anyone else. Chattels none. Precept to the Sheriffs to attach the said Benedict when, &c.

The above Cristina who discovered the body and raised the cry so that the country came, attached by Thomas Crulling and Roger le Frie.

Four neighbours attached, viz. :
Richard Gubbe, by Peter de Ward and Philip Lucas.
Roger Sterre, by Richard de Kent and Williarn atte Crouch.
Walter de Mordone, by Michael le Bret and Richard de Denemowe.
John Gubbe, by John Lucas and John de Braughwynge.

St. Michael = St. Michael, Crooked Lane.
fountain = Stow mentions that part of St. Michael, Crooked Lane, "up to a well there," was in Bridge Ward the rest and greater part of the lane being in Candelwick Street Ward - 'Survey' (ed. Kingsford), i. 216, 219.